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and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
, the rights of disabled americans including veterans who may travel the country such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message that disabled americans will always have fair access to housing, employment and education in this nation. i've mentioned a few things to treaty does not do. i like to few things to treaty does do that cause me some concern. article xxxiv establishes a committee with the rights of persons with disabilities. this committee will establish its own rules of procedure and parties to the treaty are required to submit reports every four years. in general, u.n. human rights treaty committees have made demands the state parties that fall well outside of the legal, social, economic and cultural traditions and norms of state parties. someti
to go. >> hey there. marvin nicholson white house tractor coming live from the back of a van in china. we are just coming back from the great wall of china where the president got a tour. he really had a good time. i've got to tell you great is an understatement. that thing is amazing. it goes on forever. i've never been to asia before so this trip has been incredible. not a lot of free time to get out however a couple of nice breccia and i made it out to sample cheeseburgers. the next time you're in tokyo ordered a cheeseburger. you'll be pleasantly surprised. yesterday at a few minutes in the afternoon and i got this haircut. he did not speak english and i don't speak mandarin but take a look at that thing. incredible. a little shop next door, i bought a little something in case they haircut did not turn out to good. checks this thing out. it's a panda have. it doesn't get better than that. thanks for checking out whitehouse.gov. i we'll see you next time. >> got it can't say exactly when communications director -- but it was some point between the haircut in the panda. i was told n
with 5% in europe 9% in china. we are two of 21st century economy and live in the real world of this 2.4% is not sustainable and unsuccessful. we must excel the replacement of natural gas pipelines to releasing the leaking gas filled hundreds of players including blazes that destroyed hundreds of homes. as you mention so eloquently, senator, we messed up ignoring climate change. a server, commerce committee committee and the science is clear to cutting carbon emissions over the long-term is key to reducing the risk from extreme weather. i thank you for the opportunity to testify and look forward to working together to help fellow americans healed and ensure we are all better prepared for similar service in the future. >> thank you, representatives. >> thank you, madam chairman. appreciate the invitation to speak for the committee today. i proudly represent the staten island brooklyn. staten island is one of the hardest hit areas of all of new york city. i was on the ground for the moment the storm started in the amount of devastation that i saw was unimaginable. 24 staten island or sau
, french, german, russia, china, so once all tend to view it as a proliferation problem. it tends to be about that issue very narrowly focused. so to kind of move the conversation, you have to figure a different architecture to address that. but the five plus one processors such as designed to do with the proliferation issue in the conversation is that it has to do with arantxa violations of the npt that a security council resolution suggests iran activity so forth and so on. there's two countries however that suggests the issue that this is not a proliferation issue that has to do with the character for the regime but those are for israel. the second one is iran who similarly suggested that this is nice control issue from the perspective of the west, but there really is an arms control is a multilateral icing regime. there were two that is in this particular who are not accepting the argument. the argument about nuclear infractions. so having said that, if you look at it historically, the united states has managed to negotiate successfully arms control treaties with countries of
and china were funds with in those countries. it's something like $3 trillion the government does in the national security trust fund and those have to be paid back in the general revenues. much of this deficit and debt was accumulated during the period of prosperity. relief from the 60's. we've only had to balance the budget since 1969. bill clinton had won in 1990 and lyndon johnson had one in 1969. i believe johnson was able to achieve ten because of the basic fiscal year. [laughter] typical of johnson in the fiscal year to october 1st or september 30 of which then enabled him to balance the budget, so clinton who did it legitimately i think. but in other words, the idea is we would run up the deficit when you have islam, large deficits when you have a slump, it would run at medium-size deficits in the times of prosperity. the u.s. government spending $3.6 trillion this year one-third of it is borrowed. since 2001 federal spending has gone up roughly twice the rate of economic growth. interest payments are temporarily manageable. somewhere around $250 billion a year, less than
but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democracy almost nowhere and in the project is begun. it'
the work with glen bailey and holly page. i met him 18 years ago in china. a great guy then to migrate dynel. if it hadn't been for him we would not be here tonight. so jackie, wherever she is. no, there. without heard the invitation list would have been a mess. i have known allen and simpson for just over 50 years. i grew up in wyoming. i heard all the stories and i was a kid and then i tried to do them myself. he helped me out of that. i worked 18 years. press secretary in the chief of staff, responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] when he went to retire and went harvard, i went to the smithsonian and those in charge of government. my wonderful wife, rebecca, who was right here, i'm telling you, i could not have been without her. she researched and put up the media before:00 in the morning and is amazing. so we were tired, when overseas and did a bunch of work for charities and children and blind people on the purse and came back and ended up on a sailboat. one day in 2005 the phone connected to some island to our. it rained. it was al simpson. he said, these guys want to write the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9